Avastin Resources 

Genentech is committed to providing ongoing support for your patients throughout their treatment

Visit the link below for patient brochures, condition-specific resources, and caregiver support information.

Assistance Options for Your Eligible Patients

Several options are available to help eligible patients with the out-of-pocket costs of Avastin.

Find out if your patients could be eligible using the Patient Assistance Tool

  • Is your patient insured?

  • Does your patient have commercial insurance?

    What does this mean?
  • Has your patient already been referred to the Genentech BioOncology Co-pay Card and is either ineligible or no longer receiving assistance?

  • Has your patient already been referred to an independent co-pay assistance foundation and is either ineligible or no longer receiving assistance?

  • Is the patient 18 years of age or older?

Your Patient Might Qualify for a Referral to the Genentech BioOncology Co-pay Card

If eligible commercially insured patients need assistance with their out-of-pocket costs, Avastin Access Solutions can refer them to the Genentech BioOncology Co-pay Card.*

 

Learn More

 

*In order to be eligible for the Genentech BioOncology Co-pay Card, the patient must have commercial insurance, must not have Medicare, Medicaid or other government insurance, and must meet other eligibility criteria. They also must agree to the rules set forth in the terms and conditions for the program. Please visit CopayAssistanceNow.com for the full list of terms and conditions.

Your Patient Might Qualify for a Referral to an Independent Co-pay Assistance Foundation

For eligible patients with commercial or public health insurance, Avastin Access Solutions offers referrals to independent co-pay assistance foundations.*

 

Learn More

 

*Genentech does not influence or control the operations or eligibility criteria of any independent co-pay assistance foundation and cannot guarantee co-pay assistance after a referral from Avastin Access Solutions. The foundations to which we refer patients are not exhaustive or indicative of Genentech’s endorsement or financial support. There may be other foundations to support the patient's disease state.

Your Patient Might Qualify for a Referral to the Genentech® Access to Care Foundation (GATCF)

GATCF helps eligible patients who meet specific criteria receive their Genentech medicine free of charge.*

 

Learn More

 

*To be eligible for free Genentech medicine from GATCF, insured patients must have exhausted all other forms of patient assistance (including the Genentech BioOncology Co-pay Card and support from independent co-pay assistance foundations) and meet financial criteria. Uninsured patients must meet different financial criteria.

Does Your Patient Have Commercial Insurance?

Avastin Access Solutions can refer eligible patients to the Genentech BioOncology™ Co-pay Card,* for help with the out-of-pocket cost associated with Avastin.

> Visit Genentech-Access.com/Avastin now

Does Your Patient Have Insurance?

If eligible publicly or commercially insured patients have difficulty paying for their co-pay, co-insurance or other out-of-pocket (OOP) costs, Avastin Access Solutions can refer them to an independent co-pay assistance foundation supporting their disease state.

> Learn more

Is Your Patient Uninsured or Underinsured?

Genentech® Access to Care Foundation (GATCF) provides free medicine to eligible patients who are uninsured, rendered uninsured by payer denial or underinsured. To qualify, patients must meet financial criteria.

> Learn more

*In order to be eligible for the Genentech BioOncology™ Co-pay Card, the patient must have commercial insurance; must not have Medicare. Medicaid or other government insurance; and must meet other eligibility criteria. They also must agree to the rules set forth in the terms and conditions for the program. Please visit https://www.copayassistancenow.com/#/avastin/copay-card for the full list of terms and conditions.

Genentech® and Avastin® do not influence or control the operations or eligibility criteria of any independent co-pay assistance foundation and cannot guarantee co-pay assistance after a referral from Avastin® Access Solutions. The foundations to which we refer patients are not exhaustive or indicative of Genentech's® endorsement or financial support. There may be other foundations to support the patient’s disease state.

To be eligible for free Avastin from GATCF, insured patients must have exhausted all other forms of patient assistance (including the [Genentech BioOncology™ Co-pay Card] and support from independent co-pay assistance foundations) and meet financial criteria. Uninsured patients must meet different financial criteria.

What is Avastin Access Solutions?

Avastin Access Solutions provides reliable, effective access and reimbursement support to assist your patients and practice after Avastin is prescribed.

Learn how we help

How can I find what options are available for my patient?

Determine which patient assistance option is right for your patient with the Patient Assistance Tool at Genentech-Access.com/Avastin.

How can I enroll my patients?

To enroll in Avastin Access Solutions, complete and submit the following 2 forms:

  • The SMN—a form with patient, insurance and prescription information used when contacting a patient’s health insurance plan to determine his or her coverage. 
  • The PAN—a form signed and dated by your patient giving written permission for Avastin Access Solutions to discuss his or her health information with you and the patient’s health insurance plan. 

PAN=Patient Authorization and Notice of Request for Transmission of Health Information to Genentech Access Solutions and Genentech® Access to Care Foundation.
SMN=Statement of Medical Necessity.

Once enrolled in an option, how long will my patients keep receiving assistance?

Each option has its own time period where your eligible patients will receive assistance. You can call us at (866) 422- 2377 for more information.

What if I have questions about your options?

To ask questions or to learn more about how we can help, contact us at (866) 422-2377.

Genentech offers a variety of educational resources for your practice

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Indications

Stage III or IV ovarian cancer (OC) after primary surgery
Avastin, in combination with carboplatin and paclitaxel, followed by Avastin as a single agent, is indicated for the treatment of patients with stage III or IV epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer following initial surgical resection.

Recurrent epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer (rOC)
Avastin, in combination with paclitaxel, pegylated liposomal doxorubicin, or topotecan, is indicated for the treatment of patients with platinum-resistant recurrent epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube or primary peritoneal cancer who received no more than 2 prior chemotherapy regimens.

Avastin, in combination with carboplatin and paclitaxel, or with carboplatin and gemcitabine, followed by Avastin as a single agent, is indicated for the treatment of patients with platinum-sensitive recurrent epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer.

Persistent, recurrent, or metastatic cervical cancer (CC)
Avastin, in combination with paclitaxel and cisplatin or paclitaxel and topotecan, is indicated for the treatment of patients with persistent, recurrent, or metastatic cervical cancer.

Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC)
Avastin, in combination with interferon alfa, is indicated for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

Recurrent Glioblastoma (GBM)
Avastin is indicated for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma in adults.

First-line non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)
Avastin, in combination with carboplatin and paclitaxel, is indicated for the first‑line treatment of patients with unresectable, locally advanced, recurrent or metastatic non–squamous non–small cell lung cancer.

Metastatic colorectal cancer (MCRC)
Avastin, in combination with intravenous 5‑fluorouracil-based chemotherapy, is indicated for the first‑ or second‑line treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

Avastin, in combination with fluoropyrimidine-irinotecan- or fluoropyrimidine-oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy, is indicated for the second-line treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who have progressed on a first-line Avastin-containing regimen.

Limitation of Use: Avastin is not indicated for adjuvant treatment of colon cancer.

Boxed WARNINGS

  • Gastrointestinal (GI) perforation
    • Serious and sometimes fatal GI perforation occurs at a higher incidence in Avastin-treated patients compared to patients treated with chemotherapy
    • The incidence of GI perforation ranged from 0.3% to 3% across clinical studies
    • Discontinue Avastin in patients with GI perforation
  • Surgery and wound healing complications
    • The incidence of wound healing and surgical complications, including serious and fatal complications, is increased in Avastin-treated patients
    • Withhold Avastin for at least 28 days prior to elective surgery. Do not administer Avastin for at least 28 days after surgery and until the wound is fully healed
    • Discontinue in patients with wound healing complications requiring medical intervention
  • Hemorrhage
    • Severe or fatal hemorrhage, including hemoptysis, GI bleeding, hematemesis, central nervous system hemorrhage, epistaxis, and vaginal bleeding, occurred up to 5-fold more frequently in patients receiving Avastin. In clinical studies, the incidence of grade ≥3 hemorrhagic events among patients receiving Avastin ranged from 0.4% to 7%
    • Do not administer Avastin to patients with serious hemorrhage or a recent history of hemoptysis (≥1/2 tsp of red blood)
    • Discontinue Avastin in patients who develop grade 3-4 hemorrhage

Additional serious adverse events

  • Additional serious and sometimes fatal adverse events with increased incidence in the Avastin-treated arm vs chemotherapy arm included:
    • Non-GI fistulae (<1% to 1.8%, highest in patients with cervical cancer)
    • Arterial thromboembolic events (grade ≥3, 5%, highest in patients with GBM)
    • Renal injury and proteinuria
      • Grade 3–4 proteinuria ranged from 0.7% to 7% in clinical studies
      • Nephrotic syndrome (<1%)
  • Additional serious adverse events with increased incidence in the Avastin-treated arm vs chemotherapy arm included:
    • Venous thromboembolism (grade ≥3, 11% seen in GOG-0240)
    • Hypertension (grade 3–4, 5%–18%)
    • Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) (<0.5%)
    • Congestive heart failure (CHF) (1%)
  • Infusion reactions with the first dose of Avastin occurred in <3% of patients, and severe reactions occurred in 0.2% of patients
  • Avoid use in patients with ovarian cancer who have evidence of recto-sigmoid involvement by pelvic examination or bowel involvement on CT scan or clinical symptoms of bowel obstruction
  • Inform females of reproductive potential of the risk of ovarian failure prior to initiating treatment with Avastin

Pregnancy warning

  • Based on the mechanism of action and animal studies, Avastin may cause fetal harm
  • Advise female patients that Avastin may cause fetal harm, and to inform their healthcare provider of a known or suspected pregnancy
  • Advise females of reproductive potential to use effective contraception during treatment with Avastin and for 6 months after the last dose of Avastin
  • Advise nursing women that breastfeeding is not recommended during treatment with Avastin and for 6 months following their last dose of treatment
  • Avastin may impair fertility

Most common adverse events

  • Across studies, the most common adverse reactions observed in Avastin patients at a rate >10% were:

— Epistaxis
— Headache
— Hypertension
— Rhinitis

— Proteinuria
— Taste alteration
— Dry skin
— Rectal hemorrhage

— Lacrimation disorder
— Back pain
— Exfoliative dermatitis

  • Across all studies, Avastin was discontinued in 8% to 22% of patients because of adverse reactions

Indication-specific adverse events

  • In Stage III or IV OC after primary surgery, 608 patients received CP+Avastin→Avastin, 607 patients received CP+Avastin→PBO, and 602 patients received CP+PBO→PBO. Grade 3–4 adverse reactions occurring at a higher incidence (≥2%) in either of the Avastin arms vs the chemotherapy only arm were fatigue (CP+Avastin→Avastin, 9%; CP+Avastin→PBO, 6%; CP+PBO→PBO, 6%), hypertension (CP+Avastin→Avastin, 10%; CP+Avastin→PBO, 6%; CP+PBO→PBO, 2%), platelet count decreased (CP+Avastin→Avastin, 21%; CP+Avastin→PBO, 20%; CP+PBO→PBO, 15%), and white blood cell count decreased (CP+Avastin→Avastin, 51%; CP+Avastin→PBO, 53%; CP+PBO→PBO, 50%)
  • In psOC, grade 3 or 4 adverse reactions in the OCEANS study occurring at a higher incidence (≥2%) in 247 patients receiving Avastin plus carboplatin and gemcitabine (chemotherapy), compared to 233 patients receiving placebo plus chemotherapy, were thrombocytopenia (40% vs 34%), nausea (4% vs 1.3%), fatigue (6% vs 4%), headache (4% vs 0.9%), proteinuria (10% vs 0.4%), dyspnea (4% vs 1.7%), epistaxis (5% vs 0.4%), and hypertension (17% vs 0.9%)
  • In psOC, grade 3 or 4 adverse reactions in the GOG-0213 study occurring at a higher incidence (≥2%) in 325 patients receiving Avastin plus carboplatin and paclitaxel (chemotherapy), compared to 332 patients receiving chemotherapy alone, were hypertension (11% vs 0.6%), fatigue (8% vs 3%), febrile neutropenia (6% vs 3%), proteinuria (8% vs 0%), abdominal pain (6% vs 0.9%), hyponatremia (4% vs 0.9%), headache (3% vs 0.9%), and pain in extremity (3.4% vs 0%)
  • In prOC, grade 3–4 adverse reactions in AURELIA occurring at a higher incidence (≥2%) in 179 patients receiving Avastin plus chemotherapy, compared to 181 patients receiving chemotherapy alone were hypertension (6.7% vs 1.1%) and palmar-plantar erythrodysaesthesia syndrome (4.5% vs 1.7%)
  • In CC, grade 3 or 4 adverse reactions in Study GOG-0240, occurring at a higher incidence (≥2%) in 218 patients receiving Avastin plus chemotherapy compared to 222 patients receiving chemotherapy alone, were abdominal pain (12% vs 10%), diarrhea (6% vs 3%), anal fistula (4% vs 0%), proctalgia (3% vs 0%), urinary tract infection (8% vs 6%), cellulitis (3% vs 0.5%), fatigue (14% vs 10%), hypertension (11% vs 0.5%), thrombosis (8% vs 3%), hypokalemia (7% vs 4%), hyponatremia (4% vs 1%), dehydration (4% vs 0.5%), neutropenia (8% vs 4%), lymphopenia (6% vs 3%), back pain (6% vs 3%), and pelvic pain (6% vs 1%)
  • In mRCC, the most common grade 3–5 adverse events in AVOREN, occurring at a ≥2% higher incidence in Avastin-treated patients vs controls, were fatigue (13% vs 8%), asthenia (10% vs 7%), proteinuria (7% vs 0%), hypertension (6% vs 1%, including hypertension and hypertensive crisis), and hemorrhage (3% vs 0.3%;, including epistaxis, small intestinal hemorrhage, aneurysm ruptured, gastric ulcer hemorrhage, gingival bleeding, hemoptysis, hemorrhage intracranial, large intestinal hemorrhage, respiratory tract hemorrhage, and traumatic hematoma)
  • In rGBM Study EORTC 26101, 22% of patients discontinued treatment in the Avastin with lomustine arm due to adverse reactions compared with 10% of patients in the lomustine arm. In patients receiving Avastin with lomustine, the adverse reaction profile was similar to that observed in other approved indications
  • In NSCLC, grade 3–5 (nonhematologic) and grade 4–5 (hematologic) adverse events in Study E4599 occurring at a ≥2% higher incidence in Avastin-treated patients vs controls were neutropenia (27% vs 17%), fatigue (16% vs 13%), hypertension (8% vs 0.7%), infection without neutropenia (7% vs 3%), venous thromboembolism (5% vs 3%), febrile neutropenia (5% vs 2%), pneumonitis/pulmonary infiltrates (5% vs 3%), infection with grade 3 or 4 neutropenia (4% vs 2%), hyponatremia (4% vs 1%), headache (3% vs 1%), and proteinuria (3% vs 0%)
  • In first-line MCRC, the most common grade 3–4 events in Study 2107, which occurred at a ≥2% higher incidence in the Avastin plus IFL vs IFL groups, were asthenia (10% vs 7%), abdominal pain (8% vs 5%), pain (8% vs 5%), hypertension (12% vs 2%), deep vein thrombosis (9% vs 5%), intra-abdominal thrombosis (3% vs 1%), syncope (3% vs 1%), diarrhea (34% vs 25%), constipation (4% vs 2%), leukopenia (37% vs 31%), and neutropenia (21% vs 14%)
  • In second-line MCRC, the most common grade 3–5 (nonhematologic) and 4–5 (hematologic) events in Study E3200, which occurred at a higher incidence (≥2%) in the Avastin plus FOLFOX4 vs FOLFOX4 groups, were fatigue (19% vs 13%), diarrhea (18% vs 13%), sensory neuropathy (17% vs 9%), nausea (12% vs 5%), vomiting (11% vs 4%), dehydration (10% vs 5%), hypertension (9% vs 2%), abdominal pain (8% vs 5%), hemorrhage (5% vs 1%), other neurological (5% vs 3%), ileus (4% vs 1%), and headache (3% vs 0%). These data are likely to underestimate the true adverse event rates due to the reporting mechanisms used in this study
  • When continued beyond first progression in MCRC, no new safety signals were observed in the TML study (ML18147) when Avastin was administered in second-line MCRC patients who progressed on an Avastin containing regimen in first-line MCRC. The safety data was consistent with the known safety profile established in first- and second-line MCRC5

You may report side effects to the FDA at (800) FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch.
You may also report side effects to Genentech at (888) 835-2555.

Please see full Prescribing Information, including Boxed WARNINGS, for additional important safety information.